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WHAT IS SPORTS VISION TRAINING?

Sports vision training works on improving the visual abilities of an athlete that are most necessary for excellence in their sport. Some of these abilities include eye-hand coordination, dynamic visual acuity, tracking, focusing, visual reaction time, and peripheral vision.

"In the same way that an athlete improves sports performance by training the body for strength and endurance, visual skills can be improved and enhanced through a wide range of conditioning techniques.  These are some examples of specific visual functions that Coach Arthur typically trains.

  • PERIPHERAL AWARENESS – allows perception of what’s going on at either side of you without turning your head

  • DYNAMIC VISUAL ACUITY – enables sustained and clear focus on objects when they are moving quickly

  • DEPTH PERCEPTION – provides spatial judgments, such as how far away an object or person is.

  • NEAR FAR QUICKNESS- How quickly you can change attention between distances.​

  • PERCEPTION SPAN- How quickly you visually acquire critical information.​

  • REACTION TIME- How quickly your hand reacts to a visual signal.​

  • MULTIPLE OBJECT TRACKING- How accurately you track objects moving in space with distractions.​

  • TARGET CAPTURE- How rapidly you visually shift and recognize a peripheral target.​

  • EYE HAND COORDINATION- How quickly your hand responds to changing targets.​

  • GO/NO GO- How quickly and accurately you make decisions and react in pressure situations.

  • TRACKING -The ability to accurately track and anticipate where a projectile is traveling.

 

 

Performance vision training of these skill sets is not a ‘one size fits all’ approach, as the vision skills for optimum athletic performance will vary, depending on the demands of each sport. For example, baseball players and hockey goalies need excellent hand-eye coordination and tracking abilities. Most team sports and many positions such as a hockey goalie have large demands on peripheral awareness, and dynamic visual acuity is key for baseball hitters, who must perceive the spin of the ball as it is being pitched to them."